Long Term Projects – FutureLab Europe

“Emmanuel Macron – a populist elitist?” av Enja Sæthren

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FutureLab Europe

Futurelab Europe ( FLE ) was established in 2011 as a collaboration between ten European Foundations, including Fritt Ord. European Policy Center in Brussels is responsible for the practical implementation. The program is aimed at enthusiastic young people between 20 and 30 who wish to participate in debate and influence the future course of Europe. The main focus is European participation, equal opportunities and European identity.

www.futurelabeurope.eu

‘Menneskene bak prislappen’, Maria Abdli på trykk i Morgenbladet.

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Call for applications: FutureLab Europe 2015 – The Council of Young European Citizens

Interested in Europe? FutureLab Europe focuses on engaged young people between the ages of 20 and 30 who would like to take part in debates and influence the future of Europe. The main topics of 2015 are democratic values, equal opportunities and European identity. The deadline for applications is 2 March 2015. 


Europe@debate in Oslo: The Role of New Social and Digital Media in the European Public Sphere

Footage from the recent Europe@debate in Oslo is now available online. Thank you to everyone who attended in person, or who followed the live stream or the hashtag conversation on Twitter at #FLE2014!
 

Europe@debate: The Role of New Social and Digital Media in the European Public Sphere

Together with the Körber Foundation, and as part of the FutureLab Europe project, the Fritt Ord Foundation invites the public to a debate on Monday 1 September, from 1.30 p.m. to 4 p.m., at Fritt Ord, Oslo, to discuss these the role of new social and digital media in the European public sphere.

Traditional media, such as newspapers, magazines, radio and television are often perceived as the stronghold of the older generations. Digital natives, born into the information age, are said to prefer online media. Does this divide reflect the European media landscape today? If we presume that an open and transparent exchange of ideas is a prerequisite for a healthy democracy – what does it say about the EU that this seems to be missing? On which arenas are European citizens most likely to engage in political debates? Can social media open up a new space for discussing the European Project?